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State Seal Kentucky Horse Park
WALK LIKE AN EGYPTIAN ARABIAN
Press Release Date:  May 23, 2005
Contact: 

Cindy Rullman, 859-259-4209, crullman@kyhorsepark.com

 

 

          LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 23, 2005) Less than four percent of all Arabian horses are considered Egyptian Arabians.  Many of these exquisitely bred horses will journey to the Kentucky Horse Park from their homes around the world for the Egyptian Event, June 6-11.

          “All modern-day light horse breeds have descended from the noble desert-bred Arabian horse, who traces its lineage back at least 3,500 years to the deserts of the Middle East and ancient Persia,” states the Pyramid Society, which is an Arabian breeders’ organization and the organizer of the Egyptian Event.  “The Bible recounts that even King Solomon purchased horses from Egypt to fill many of his 40,000 stalls, and ancient hieroglyphic inscriptions reveal the Egyptians with their desert horses as early as 1580 B.C.”

          Approximately 350 horses, whose owners come from a number of Middle Eastern countries, Germany, Australia, South America, Canada and across the U.S., make the trip to woo and wow audiences with their beauty and elegance during the Silver Anniversary of the Egyptian Event at the park.

          The Pyramid Society’s website relates, “Between 1895 and the mid 1980s, some of the best Egyptian Arabians bred in the land of the Nile were exported to the United States.  Those individuals and their ancestors form the nucleus of the Egyptian Arabian bloodlines in North America.”

           John Nicholson, Executive Director of the Kentucky Horse Park observed, “The qualifications for a horse to be registered as a straight Egyptian Arabian are rigorous and exacting, which makes the Egyptian Event one of the truly special Arabian shows in the world.”

          He concluded, “All horses are beautiful, but once you’ve seen the refined face and soulful eyes of these regally-bred Egyptian Arabians, you’ll be hooked for life.  This is an event that our park audiences especially enjoy because you don’t have to know anything about horses to see that there is something very special about this breed.  They have a fire inside that comes to life when they enter the show ring.  These horses know they’re special.”

          The show starts at 8 am each morning and goes well into the evening.  In addition to  various classes in which the horses will be competing, there will also be a live stallion breeding auction, extensive trade show, educational opportunities for adults and youth, stallion exhibitions and barn parties.  A horse first-aid class will be held June 8 at 8 am.  Admission to the Egyptian Event is free with Kentucky Horse Park admission.

           The Pyramid Society is headquartered in the National Horse Center at the Kentucky Horse Park.  For more information, contact Beth Garrity, 859-231-0771 or email beth@pyramidsociety.org.  You may also view their Web site at www.pyramidsociety.org.

          Editor’s Note: A beautiful photo of an Egyptian Arabian horse is available for use in your publication by emailing crullman@kyhorsepark.com.

          From March 15-October 31, the park is open seven days a week.  Admission is $14 for adults and $7 for children ages 7-12.  Children six and under are always admitted free of charge. Admission includes the Egyptian Event and the American Saddlebred Museum

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          The Kentucky Horse Park is a working horse farm/theme park and equine competition facility dedicated to man’s relationship with the horse.  The park is an agency of the Kentucky Commerce Cabinet that hosted more than 900,000 visitors and 15,000 competition horses in 80 special events and horse shows in 2004.  The park is located at Exit 120, Interstate 75, just north of Lexington.  The place to get close to horses, the park is open daily March 15 to October 31, and Wednesday through Sunday, November 1 to March 14.

 






 

Last updated: Monday, May 23, 2005