Kentucky Horse Park
Kentucky Derby Winner Go for Gin Retires to Kentucky Horse Park

Press Release Date:  Thursday, August 11, 2011  
Contact Information:  Cindy Rullman, 859-259-4209, Cindy.Rullman@ky.gov  


 

LEXINGTON, KY (August 11, 2011)  Go for Gin, the 1994 winner of the Kentucky Derby (G1), has arrived in Lexington, Kentucky, to make his home in the Kentucky Horse Park's Hall of Champions alongside fellow Derby winner Funny Cide, two-time Breeders' Cup winner Da Hoss, and racing superstar Cigar. 

John Nicholson, executive director of the Kentucky Horse Park, said, "Go for Gin will make another great addition to our Hall of Champions.  We entertain nearly 1 million visitors each year and they will be delighted to have the opportunity to meet a horse of his caliber, who performed so well in all three Triple Crown races." 

Go for Gin was bred in Kentucky by Pamela DuPont Darmstadt, owned by William J. Condren and Joseph M. Cornacchia, and trained by Nick Zito.  As a 2-year-old, the son of Cormorant-Never Knock, by Stage Door Johnny won the Remsen S (G2).  At 3, he was one of the few racehorses to beat the mighty Holy Bull, which he did in winning the Derby.  He followed that win with a second in the Preakness S (G1) to Tabasco Cat and second in the Belmont S (G1), also to Tabasco Cat.  That same year he also came up just short in the Wood Memorial (G1) and Fountain of Youth S (G2) for second. 

In all, from ages 2 to 4, Go for Gin was in the money in 14 out of 19 starts with earnings of $1,380,866. 

He took up stud duty at Claiborne Farm in Kentucky, and was later sold to Bonita Farm in Maryland, where he has been standing since 2004.  His progeny have earned more than $16.5 million and include Albert the Great, winner of more than $3 million.

William Boniface, owner of Bonita Farm, stated, "On behalf of our very dear friend and partner Joe Cornacchia, Bonita Farm is appreciative that the Kentucky Horse Park has accepted our donation of the Kentucky Derby winner Go for Gin.  I feel that their work providing for and displaying to the public the Top Thoroughbreds is very beneficial to our sport."

John Nicholson concluded, "We're glad that his connections chose to allow Go for Gin to spend the rest of his days at the Kentucky Horse Park, where he will continue to be respected, appreciated and well cared-for."

The public is invited to welcome him back home to Kentucky.

Park Hours and Rates: Through November 6, the park is open seven days a week.  Admission is $16 for adults, $9 for children 7-12.  Children six and under are always admitted free of charge.  Admission includes the International Museum of the Horse - In Association with the Smithsonian Institution - and the American Saddlebred Museum.

EDITOR'S NOTE:  A high-resolution photo of Go For Gin at the Kentucky Horse Park is available for use with this press release by emailing Cindy.Rullman@ky.gov.  


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The Kentucky Horse Park is a working horse farm/theme park and equine competition facility dedicated to man's relationship with the horse.  The park is an agency of the Kentucky Tourism, Arts and Heritage Cabinet that hosted more than one million visitors and campers, as well as 15,000 competition horses in more than 100 special events and horse shows in 2010.  The park is home to the National Horse Center which comprises more than 30 national and regional equine organizations.   Located at Exit 120, Interstate 75, just north of Lexington, the Kentucky Horse Park is The place to get close to horses.   Open daily March 15 to October 31, and Wednesday through Sunday, November 1 to March 14.