Kentucky Division of Waste Management
Remedial work in progress at old landfills

Press Release Date:  Monday, February 05, 2007  
Contact Information:  Eva Smith-Carroll, Division of Waste Management, (502) 564-6716  


FRANKFORT, Ky. (Feb. 5, 2007) – Environmental remediation is finished or nearing completion at a number of old, closed landfills around the state, Environmental and Public Protection Cabinet (EPPC) Secretary Teresa J. Hill announced today.

“These projects, which are under the direction of the EPPC, are aimed at protecting human health and the environment,” Hill said. “That is a top priority of both this cabinet and Governor Ernie Fletcher’s administration.”

Funding for the upgrades is being provided by the Kentucky Pride Program created by the General Assembly in 2002.  Program money comes from a $1.75 per ton fee paid by generators of waste disposed at municipal solid waste landfills as well as from proceeds of a $25 million bond issue. The projects are:

Old Floyd County Landfill -- More than $3 million in environmental remediation work is near completion. Improvements include a barrier-type cap to prevent entry of rainwater and minimize leachate, surface water drainage, a leachate collection and pumping system and a sewer line to the city of Martin waste water treatment plant.  Leachate is water that collects contaminants as it seeps through the landfill.

Old Cynthiana Landfill -- A $1.2 million system to treat leachate on-site has been constructed at the old Harrison County landfill. Previously the city had to pay $60,000 a year to have leachate hauled off site and treated. The system includes a lined holding lagoon and constructed wetlands to treat leachate. Wetland plantings will be done in the spring.

Old Manchester Landfill -- Work at the old landfill in Clay County, including construction of a wetland to treat leachate, should be finished in late summer at an estimated cost of $5 million. In addition to wetland construction, waste will be consolidated so it covers a smaller area and drainage improvements will be made. Currently the landfill cover is being regraded to prevent ponding of stormwater.

Leitchfield landfills -- More than $3 million in environmental remediation work at the Leitchfield Landfill at Millwood and the old Leitchfield Landfill in Grayson County is complete with the exception of wetland plantings that will be done in the spring. A new leachate treatment system was constructed at Millwood, including an on-site lined holding lagoon and constructed wetlands to treat leachate. Previously the city of Leitchfield spent $16,000 a year to haul and treat leachate off site. The landfill improvements cost $650,000. At the old Leitchfield Landfill waste was consolidated so it covers a smaller area, the landfill cover was upgraded to limit water contact and a storm drainage control system was constructed. The project cost $2.9 million.

Old Perry County Landfill -- Work totaling $3.7 million will resume in the spring and should be complete by summer. It includes regrading the landfill cap, barrier upgrade of the east area cap, some waste relocation, drainage features and  a leachate drain and pumping system.

Old Harlan County Landfill -- Around $3.2 million in environmental remediation work is near completion. The project involved overall site storm water and erosion control improvements, slope stabilization, construction of a barrier-type cap to prevent entry of rainwater and minimize leachate, and a leachate collection and treatment system, including a lined holding lagoon and wetland cells.  Wetland plantings and permanent seeding will be done in the spring.

Scott County landfills -- More than $2.3 million in work at the old Sims Road Landfill should be complete this month. The project was done under a memorandum of agreement between EPPC and the city of Georgetown, with the state providing $1.86 million. Improvements include consolidating waste into a smaller area and installing a leachate collection system connected to a wastewater treatment plant. Construction was completed at Briar Hill Landfill in last year. The property, the site of a dump used by a lead pencil factory, is now owned by Georgetown. The city, under an agreement with the cabinet, contracted $1.2 million in cleanup activities and landfill capping work at the landfill.

Old Campbellsville Landfill -- Initial work on a $9 million remediation project at the landfill in Taylor County is complete, including relocating waste that was found off site, winter cover placement, constructing a drain to divert spring water away from the landfill and a leachate collection and pumping system. Construction on the next phase will begin in the spring and completion is expected in October. That will include a barrier-type cap to prevent entry of rainwater and minimize leachate, soil cover, landfill gas headers and vents, groundwater monitoring wells, wildlife pond, access roads and final seeding and installation of a security fence.

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Work-in-progress photos of some of the sites are available. Contact Eva.Smith-Carroll@ky.gov