Governor Ernie Fletcher’s Communications Office
Governor Fletcher Announces Funding for Hurstbourne Parkway Project in Louisville

Press Release Date:  Wednesday, April 04, 2007  
Contact Information:  Jodi Whitaker
502-564-2611

Doug Hogan
502-564-3419
 


Project will improve road network on University of Louisville’s Shelby Campus

FRANKFORT, Ky. – Governor Ernie Fletcher visited the University of Louisville’s Shelby Campus today to announce $5.3 million in funding for the U.S. 60 Hurstbourne Parkway project. New roadway connections will be built between Hurstbourne Parkway and Whipps Mill Road. 

“The investment we are making in this highway infrastructure project will accelerate the University’s development of a business and technology park on the Shelby Campus,” Governor Fletcher. “We are committed to helping the university build this campus into a thriving research and technology complex.”

The newly designed road network will serve this campus and provide additional traffic connections to help reduce congestion at the Hurstbourne Parkway and Shelbyville Road intersection. The primary Shelby Campus entrance will be aligned with Whittington Parkway, which will help improve traffic flow on Shelbyville Road. The average daily traffic on Hurstbourne Parkway between Whipps Mill Road and U.S. 60 is approximately 22,000 vehicles.

“I am so pleased that the governor and our state legislators recognize the importance of laying this foundation for our new and improved Shelby Campus,” said University of Louisville President Dr. James Ramsey.  “The research and technology activity unfolding here will help the economy in a number of ways. For example, our biosafety lab will create jobs, employ more people in the high-tech science sector, bring in increased federal research funding, offer training students can bring to the workforce, and lead to spin-off businesses.”

The university will be the lead in this project will assume oversight, coordination and management responsibility for the design and construction phases.  The university is responsible for covering costs above $5.3 million.  The total project is expected to be an approximate $5.8 million investment. 

“I am very appreciative that the administration has made this a priority item,” said Rep. Scott Brinkman (R-Louisville). “This is not just a Louisville and Jefferson County project.  By enhancing the research and business offerings at the University of Louisville, the entire state benefits.” 

“Governor Fletcher has articulated a vision for the transportation plan here in Louisville which will result in a significant reduction in congestion for the Hurstbourne Parkway and Shelbyville Road area,” said Sen. Julie Denton (R-Louisville). “This is the kind of leadership which will enable the Shelby Campus and area commerce to continue to flourish and grow.”

The project is a part of the enacted six-year highway plan.  State construction dollars will be used. 

“These projects are further examples of the excellent working relationship Governor Fletcher has with community leaders,” said Transportation Cabinet Secretary Bill Nighbert.  “As we improve our highway network we are improving the quality of life for and building stronger communities for residents across the state.”

Belknap Campus funding announcement

Governor Ernie Fletcher also presented a ceremonial check to President Ramsey and the University in the amount of $1 million to be used for a major re-design project at the Belknap Campus entrance. 

The one-way entrance and exit will be moved further apart and extended to 3rd Street to create a safer entry area.  This context sensitive design project will include green space buffering with landscaping using aesthetically pleasing stamped concrete cobblestones or brickwork to replace portions of the roadway.  This design approach will serve as a traffic calming measure and will improve safety for drivers making right turns into The Oval.

The Oval is a significant historic symbol of the University.  It was designed by the famous Frederick Law Olmstead firm around the beginning of the 20th Century.


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